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Projects and Courses

My Nola, My Story

Dr. Shearon Roberts (Xavier University of Louisiana)

Shearon Roberts smiling

These stories reflect snapshots of lived experiences of communities of color who have called New Orleans home. It serves as a testament that they were here, are here, and shaped the fabric of this historic, cultural space.

Project Goals

To offer students opportunities for experiential learning as they record and share the stories of people of color in New Orleans.

Outcomes & Deliverables

A series of online exhibits and videos exploring aspects of history, identity, and culture, including the impact of Caribbean diasporic communities on New Orleans.

Resources

My Nola, My Story

Over 65 student-created exhibits, videos, podcasts, and other materials highlighting the lives of people of color in New Orleans.

Boswell’s: Home Away from Home

As one example of a student-produced work, this feature highlights Boswell’s Jamaican Grill and its owner, Boswell Atkinson.

StoryMap: New Orleans and LAC

This map-based exhibit explores relationships between New Orleans and peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean.

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Projects and Courses

Kamau at 90

Dr. Aaron Kamugisha (University of the West Indies at Cave Hill, Barbados)

Aaron Kamugisha applauding for presenter

Given the challenges for learning and online instruction during the pandemic, the course took a more traditional format focused on the lifework of Barbadian poet Kamau Brathwaite, who passed away early in the semester.

Resources

Course poster

Dr. Kamugisha’s course focused on Brathwaite’s lifework alongside other writing and criticism

Kamau Brathwaite at the Poetry Foundation

Brathwaite published over 10 poetry collections, including poems such as “Bermudas” and “Bread.”

Brathwaite on PennSound

A selection of audio recordings of Brathwaite’s readings of his work.

Categories
Tools and Topics

Teaching Guides in dLOC

dLOC holds a wide range of teaching materials for K-12 and college/university-level courses that are primarily in English. Below are a sample of highlighted courses and teaching materials.


Courses & Syllabi

Puerto Rico Syllabus

Yarimar Bonilla, Marisol Lebrón, and Sarah Molinari developed “Puerto Rico Syllabus: Essential tools for critical thinking about the Puerto Rican debt crisis.”

Caribbean Syllabus

Francis Negrón-Muntaner, Mimi Sheller, and colleagues developed “Caribbean Syllabus: life and debt in the Caribbean,” an 18 unit thematic course.

Introduction to Advancing Sexuality Studies

The Caribbean Region of the International Resource Network created “Introduction to Advancing Sexuality Studies: A short course on sexuality theory and research methodologies”

Teaching Materials

Digital Collection

Hyacinth Simpson worked with Olive Senior to create an online edition of her poetry collection “Gardening in the Tropics” that includes text, audio, and author notes.

Archival Materials

Our Americas Archive Partnership is “a multi-institutional digital humanities project that aims to develop curricular models and teaching materials that embody a hemispheric approach to the study of the Americas.”

K-12 Lesson Plans

This handout includes links to prize winning K-12 lesson plans as well as a series of teaching guides produced for undergraduate teaching, primarily of Caribbean literature.

Panama Teaching Resources

Video Presentation

A recorded video of Sonja Watson’s presentation “The Politics of Race in Panama”

Afro-Antilleans in the Panama Canal Museum Collection

Margarita Vargas-Betancourt’s presentation “Finding the Silver Voice: Afro-Antilleans in the Panama Canal Museum Collection at the University of Florida”

Bibliography

Isabel Silver compiled a selected bibliography of digitized materials in the Panama and the Canal digital library. It also includes search items for each topic and photos for teaching

Book Lecture

Olive Senior’s lecture about her book Dying to Better Themselves: West Indians and the Building of the Panama Canal

Literature Example

Olive Senior discusses Caribbean labor mobility in her article titled “The Colon People: Part I, Jamaica the Neglected Garden”

Panama Silver Asian Gold

Course materials for “Panama Silver Asian Gold: Migration Money and the Making of the Modern Caribbean”

Categories
Projects and Courses

Storytelling through Oral History & Digital Timelines in a High School English Class

Dr. Erin Zavitz
(Bosque School)


We’re focusing on learning more about ordinary people’s lives and understanding how everyone has a story to tell even if it’s not one that makes it in a book.

Project Overview: Oral History

  • 10th Grade (private High School) English course project
  • Conduct an oral history interview with an individual of your choosing
  • Create an interview plan, including description of the narrator, interview location, interview technology, letter to the narrator, and questions
  • Obtain informed consent
  • Complete a video reflection in which you reflect on your experience and what you learned through the oral history interview

Outcomes & Deliverables

Students reflect on the importance of storytelling in the context of the texts they read in class, and acknowledge the importance of how we tell stories as well as how those stories get told.


In the past I have had students make their own timelines, but I’ve found that having too many people on one spreadsheet is a disaster. This time, I entered their data in Timeline JS and shared the versions with them for a peer review. . . By having them work in groups and share their work, they were more engaged with the entire process.

Project Overview: Timeline Biography

  • Group activity in which students create a timeline of William Shakespeare’s life in preparation for reading The Tempest
  • Conduct biographical research and compare important life events and their relevance
  • Data is entered in Timeline JS and reviewed by class

Outcomes & Deliverables

Students learn about Shakespeare’s life and the historical context when he lived, better understanding how he may have been influenced when writing The Tempest.

Resources

Oral History Assignment

Rationale and instructions for oral history assignment (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Shakespeare Timeline Assignment

Complete instructions for timeline assignment (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Tools & Topics: Oral History

Learn more about the oral history presentations from the 2019 institute, and find relevant resources

Categories
Projects and Courses

A Phenomenology of Gede: Thinking with the Dead in Haiti

Dr. Nathan Dize (Vanderbilt University)


This course proposes a study of Haitian literature through the lens of Gede as authors transgress temporal, spatial, and linguistic boundaries to communicate with and through the dead.

Course Goals

Three objectives for this course:

  • to familiarize students with a broad spectrum of Haitian writing about and through the memories of the dead;
  • to facilitate student exposure to Haitian modes of thinking and religious praxis;
  • and to develop skills in identifying, interpreting, and constructing historical narratives that foreground the voices of the dead through written and presentational assignments

Outcomes & Deliverables

The course emphasizes student research in digital collections of Caribbean primary and secondary sources to facilitate close reading of textual and visual materials.

Resources

Course syllabus

Schedule with descriptions of assignments and links to digital resources (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Vodou Archive

The course made heavy use of this collection, which includes over 300 photos, texts, video, and scholarly works.

Institute Reflection

Dr. Dize’s perspective on the institute experience

Categories
Projects and Courses

Roots of the Commonwealth: Caribbean Provisions from the British Empire to the 21st Century

Dr. Keja Valens, Salem State University


We will consider literary, historical, and archival materials as we work to chart the ways that provisions have been planted and transplanted, prepared and consumed, imagined and depicted in relation to ideas of indigeneity, independence, and community in the Caribbean and its diaspora.

Course Overview

  • ENG 715: Topics in Digital Studies, a graduate-level course
  • Examine and use concepts and practices of postcolonial digital humanities to trace literary, culinary, agricultural, and economic paths of ground provisions with a focus on provisions such as yuca, yam and plantain in and through the Caribbean from the 15th through the 21st centuries.
  • Draw course materials from the Early Caribbean Digital Archive, the Digital Library of the Caribbean, HathiTrust, the Internet Archive and other similar sources to develop digital projects that include mapping, timelines, and curated exhibits.

Outcomes & Deliverables

Students completed a series of assignments focused on critical analysis of primary sources and interpretation through digital tools. They completed reflective writings and developed “Provisions,” a multi-exhibit Omeka project.

Resources

Course Syllabus

Spring 2020 schedule with links to additional resources and readings (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Assignment: Mapping & Meaning

Designed to support critical and conceptual thinking about maps (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Assignment: How are West Indians Represented in the Archive?

Reflecting on Lady Nugent’s Journal (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Exhibit: Provisions

A series of student-created Omeka exhibits on the role of ground provisions such as yams in Caribbean foodways

New Digital Worlds

Students read Dr. Roopika Risam’s book throughout the semester.

Institute Reflection

Keja discusses how the institute impacted her course.

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