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Projects and Courses

Language & the Caribbean

Molly Hamm-Rodríguez (University of Colorado Boulder)

Molly Hamm-Rodríguez and Nadjah Ríos Villarini in conversation at the May 2019 institute

Framing language as a central site of social action, students will consider both the ideological formations that influence language policies and practices as well as the interactional perspectives that illustrate how language (de)constructs relational identities and social worlds, in the Caribbean and its diasporas.

Course Goals

  • Use sociolinguistic, sociocultural, and linguistic anthropological perspectives to explore language variation and use across the Caribbean and its diasporas.
  • Students study the dynamic nature of language within historical and contemporary processes
  • Challenge colonial origins of linguistic and geographic fragmentation by centering linguistic diversity

Students use diverse theoretical approaches to explore language variation in the Caribbean and Caribbean diasporas through a decolonizing perspective.

Outcomes & Deliverables

Reading responses that critically engage course topics, multimodal keyword definitions, genre study, speech communities digital presentation

Resources

Molly’s Course Syllabus

Find more information about Hamm-Rodríguez’s “Language & the Caribbean” course. (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Black Lives Will Not Matter Until Our Languages Also Matter

As part of the course, students are assigned this video lecture from Dr. Michel DeGraff, linguistics professor and director of the MIT-Haiti Initiative.

Categories
Projects and Courses

Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean

Dr. Rhonda Cobham-Sander (Amherst College), Dr. Donette Francis (University of Miami), Dr. Leah Rosenberg (University of Florida)


Students in the course undertake archival research, digital scholarship, and literary studies of the Caribbean through an interdisciplinary lens. Through class assignments, they consider the colonial dimensions of archives, examining how particular facets of identity and subalternity influence Caribbean writers and scholars.

Outcomes & Deliverables

Students examine topics of intersectionality across archival material and produce digital projects using Scalar, Wikipedia, and the Wiki service PBWorks.

Resources

Course Syllabus

The “Panama Silver, Asian Gold” syllabus is included in Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities, a born-digital, peer-reviewed resource available on Humanities Commons

Assignments

Examples of course assignments shared at the institute.

Example PBWorks Site

Wiki for Dr. Rosenberg’s course “Tourism and Caribbean Literature”

Categories
Projects and Courses

Roots of the Commonwealth: Caribbean Provisions from the British Empire to the 21st Century

Dr. Keja Valens, Salem State University


We will consider literary, historical, and archival materials as we work to chart the ways that provisions have been planted and transplanted, prepared and consumed, imagined and depicted in relation to ideas of indigeneity, independence, and community in the Caribbean and its diaspora.

Course Overview

  • ENG 715: Topics in Digital Studies, a graduate-level course
  • Examine and use concepts and practices of postcolonial digital humanities to trace literary, culinary, agricultural, and economic paths of ground provisions with a focus on provisions such as yuca, yam and plantain in and through the Caribbean from the 15th through the 21st centuries.
  • Draw course materials from the Early Caribbean Digital Archive, the Digital Library of the Caribbean, HathiTrust, the Internet Archive and other similar sources to develop digital projects that include mapping, timelines, and curated exhibits.

Outcomes & Deliverables

Students completed a series of assignments focused on critical analysis of primary sources and interpretation through digital tools. They completed reflective writings and developed “Provisions,” a multi-exhibit Omeka project.

Resources

Course Syllabus

Spring 2020 schedule with links to additional resources and readings (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Assignment: Mapping & Meaning

Designed to support critical and conceptual thinking about maps (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Assignment: How are West Indians Represented in the Archive?

Reflecting on Lady Nugent’s Journal (Shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license.)

Exhibit: Provisions

A series of student-created Omeka exhibits on the role of ground provisions such as yams in Caribbean foodways

New Digital Worlds

Students read Dr. Roopika Risam’s book throughout the semester.

Institute Reflection

Keja discusses how the institute impacted her course.

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